This Couple Scammed Amazon Out of $1.2 Million. Now They Have to Pay It Back

A couple from Muncie, Ind. swindled Amazon out of more than $1.2 million in electronics.

Erin Finan, 38, and Leah Finan, 37, used a classic scam—buying items and then reporting them missing or damaged. That’s how they scored the GoPro digital cameras, Microsoft Xboxes, Samsung smartwatches, and Microsoft Surface tablets that they sold to accomplice Danijel Glumac, 28, who then sold the merchandise to an unnamed “New York entity,” according to authorities.

For Amazon, it’s often cheaper to replace items when these claims are filed than to investigate. But after using hundreds of fake online identities to grift the online retail giant, the husband and wife team face up to 20 years behind bars for fraud and money laundering.

Per their plea agreement, the couple waived their right to appeal the decision if they’re sentenced to fewer than seven years and three months in prison, and they must repay Amazon $1,218,504.

The Finans only made $725,000 off the scheme, according to authorities. Judge Tanya Watt Pratt set the sentencing for Nov. 9.

Former Equifax chief will face questions from U.S. Congress over hack

U.S. lawmakers are due to question the former head of Equifax Inc (EFX.N) at a Tuesday hearing that could shed light on how hackers accessed the personal data of more than 140 million consumers.

Richard Smith retired last week but the 57-year-old executive will answer for the breach that the credit bureau acknowledged in early September.

Late Monday, Equifax said an independent review had boosted the number of potentially affected U.S. consumers by 2.5 million to 145.5 million.

In March, the U.S. Homeland Security Department alerted Equifax to an online gap in security but the company did nothing, said Smith.

“The vulnerability remained in an Equifax web application much longer than it should have,” Smith said in remarks prepared for delivery on Tuesday. “I am here today to apologize to the American people myself.”

Smith will face the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Tuesday but there will be three more such hearings this week.

Equifax keeps a trove of consumer data for banks and other creditors who want to know whether a customer is likely to default.

The cyber-hack has been a calamity for Equifax which has lost roughly a quarter of its stock market value and seen several top executives step down alongside Smith.

Smith’s replacement, Paulino do Rego Barros Jr., has also apologized for the hack and said the company will help customers freeze their credit records and monitor any misuse.

There has been a public outcry about the breech but no more than 3.0 percent of consumers have frozen their credit reports, according to research firm Gartner, Inc.

Smith said hackers tapped sensitive information between mid-May and late-July.

Security personnel noticed suspicious activity on July 29 and disabled web application a day later, ending the hacking, Smith said. He said he was alerted the following day, but was not aware of the scope of the stolen data.

On Aug. 2, the company alerted the FBI and retained a law firm and consulting firm to provide advice. Smith notified the board’s lead director on Aug. 22.

Tesla deliveries rise in third quarter, but Model 3 faces ‘bottlenecks’

Luxury electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc (TSLA.O) said on Monday its deliveries rose 4.5 percent in the third quarter from the prior-year period, but said “production bottlenecks” had left the company behind its planned ramp-up for the new Model 3 mass-market sedan.

Tesla said it delivered 26,150 vehicles in the third quarter, including 14,065 Model S vehicles and 11,865 Model X cars, up 17.7 percent from the second quarter of this year.

The Palo Alto, California-based company delivered just 220 Model 3 sedans and produced 260 during the quarter. In July, it began production of the Model 3, which starts at $35,000 – half the starting price of the Model S.

Tesla had said in its second-quarter financial report that it expects “to achieve a rate of 5,000 Model 3 vehicles per week by the end of 2017.” The automaker also said it expects at some point in 2018 to further ramp to a rate of “10,000 Model 3 vehicles per week,” and an annual production rate in excess of 500,000 vehicles.
“It is important to emphasize that there are no fundamental issues with the Model 3 production or supply chain,” Tesla said in a statement. “We understand what needs to be fixed and we are confident of addressing the manufacturing bottleneck issues in the near term.”

Tesla said it was on track to deliver around 100,000 S and X models this year.
But Tesla said on Monday that a handful of systems at its Fremont, California, car plant and its battery factory in Reno, Nevada, “have taken longer to activate than expected.”

The automaker said 4,820 Model S and X vehicles were in transit to customers at the end of the third quarter and would be counted with its fourth-quarter figures.

In after-market trading, Tesla shares fell more than 1 percent to $337.84, from the closing price on Nasdaq of $341.53.